Sunday, October 30, 2011

A Priest and A Muslim

I had lunch earlier today. I sat down by myself at the bar and waited for my food. I began to eat and noticed that a muslim woman sat two chairs away from me. (a chair between us) I was eating and reading my book (Frank Herbert's Dune) when I thought to myself, "I should say 'hi' at the least."

So I turned and said, "Hello." She asked about the book I was reading. Then we just started talking about different things:
When I became a priest and where I am stationed
What she is studying (historic preservation ~I think that is what she said~)
The understanding of a Christian and Islamic prophet
Jesus Christ (as held in the Christian faith and Islamic faith)
The Trinity
Muslim understanding of modesty
The Hajj (the pilgrimage to Mecca)

We had the most fascinating time understanding each other. Our inter-religious dialogue...our understanding of life...it truly was a great lunch conversation.

     

We were a bit embarrassed when the waiters and waitresses would comment as they walked by with their dishes:
Everyone is in awe of both of you talking.
Can we have a picture of the both of you? 
I really wish I was a part of this conversation!
Gosh I would love to sit in on this talk. 
It was a little weird to hear about all the attention we brought to ourselves by simply talking. I mean, to us, we were just talking, enjoying the conversation and listening to each other...but I guess it was interesting for people to see us talk in public; her in her Islamic modest dress and me in my clerics.

A part of me was relieved we didn't take the picture. I mean, we weren't trying to show off. I understand and appreciate why people wanted a picture taken; still, we were just talking and enjoying our meals.

2 comments:

  1. Praise God! And the attention that you drew was certainly understandable: it is hardly a commonplace occurrence. However, those of us who've been on the GMU mission also have a new sense of just what a deep spiritual hunger there is in the supposedly secular world. People have questions about God. People want to know about God. In our culture that relativizes and subjectivizes the very question, it always gets folks' attention. Very proud of you and your interlocutor, Father! Al-hamdilullah as they'd say in Arabic!

    G

    ReplyDelete
  2. that is awesome.
    -nhu

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